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How to spot Doulton in a crowd!

Another hand-painted rose design from Limoges

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If you like Downton Abbey…

You may also wish to try watching Australian TV series called “Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.” I am usually not a huge fan of mysteries (even though in my early teens I would lose regular sleep over stories by Agatha Christie and Arthur Conan Doyle), but this one won my heart and after devouring two seasons (thanks to holidays!) I can’t wait for the third one. It is not just a mystery show, it also has romance, gorgeous costumes (oh, those flapper dresses and head pieces!) and Art Nouveau decor, jazz, and a Hispano-Suiza (never heard about it until this show, what a beauty!). But once again, it is not just that. It is about a “modern woman”, lady detective Miss Phryne Fisher (played by beautiful Essie Davis), living in a traditional society of 1920s. The main character also reminds me of a female protagonist in “Easy Virtue” (played by Jessica Biel).

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The Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota

The Ringling Museum of Arts is located on the West coast of Florida in the town of Sarasota. I have visited the museum few years ago but haven’t had a chance to share photos from that visit until recently a friend and I had a lively discussion on Pre-Raphaelite artists and their paintings during our break from work. I have mentioned to her that in that trip, I saw two paintings belonging to brushes of Pre-Raphaelite artists and promised to find the photos so both of us can appreciate them; it happened that the museum’s photos had been lost in-between thousands of photographs saved on numerous flashcards, computers, and hard drives (I can get incredibly messy and unorganized with my files sometimes!). I spent the whole evening looking for those photos and finally, when there was no hope anymore, I have found them! And I must share them with you.

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The museum was designed by architect John H. Phillips in 1925 and construction was finished in 1928. The below photos are of the internal yard dividing the museum in two parts.

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Below, are two tapestries by Peter Paul Rubens. They are huge.

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“The Triumph of Divine Love” (1625).

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“The Virgin and Child in Majesty with Saints Quentin and Placidus” by Domenico Puligo (c.1521-1522)

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“La Sultana Rossa” by Titian (1550s)

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Circle of Pieter Coecke van Aeist, Triptych: “Christ Arrested in the Garden of Gethsemane” (left wing), “The Annunciate Virgin” (left wing verso), “The Adoration of the Magi” (center), “Christ Carrying the Cross” (right wing), “The Angel of the Annunciation” (right wing verso) (c.1520)

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“Pausias and Glycera” by Paul Rubens (1612-1615)

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“The Departure of Lot and His Family from Sodom” by Peter Paul Rubens (c.1613-1615).

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“Philip IV, King of Spain” by Diego Velazquez (c.1625-1628)

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“Saint Paul” by El Greco (c.1605).

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“Roman Courtship” by Sir William Ernest Reynolds-Stephens (c.1900).

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The Sirens (Les femmes chasseresses) by Edward Burne-Jones (c.1891-1898)

Holiday Craft Bonanza! – Retro Felt Christmas Tree Skirt Tutorial

Bitter Sweet Susie

Ok how it is only a week before Christmas?  WEEK. I had great plans for making lovely crafted gifts for every person I have ever met. Instead I am going to re-watch Twin Peaks for the millionth time and skip the holiday altogether.

A month or so back I was full stop into the Christmas Spirit. I did manage to crank out some crafts for EHOW and now I can share them with you.

All of them are simple and easily customizable. You still have time to do any of these guys before the holiday knocks on our door. Most you can do while watching your favorite holiday film (or two!) and will give you the satisfaction of being one crafty and creative bad ass mother fucker.

So get on with it!

First up – The Retro Felt Christmas Tree Skirt

Bittersweet Susie | Retro Felt Tree Skirt Tutorial

This project can be easily changed to match your…

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✄ DIY Retro 1950s Starburst/Atomic T-Shirt ✄

✄ DIY Retro 1950s Starburst/Atomic T-Shirt ✄

Can’t wait to do this one!

The Crafty Gentleman

I don’t know what it is about the styles of the fifties and sixties that captures my imagination so much. I love this era. The patterns, decor, music… how did it ever go out of fashion?!

Retro 1950s Starburst Pattern Inspiration: Retro 1950s Starburst Pattern

Retro 1950s Starburst Pattern Inspiration: Retro 1950s Starburst Pattern

I’ve already written a DIY post about how a 50s atomic print inspired me to use fabric paint to make a retro style T-shirt (read here). Recently, I thought I’d try another approach to replicating a 50s inspired print onto a plain t-shirt – this time simply using my sewing machine! Here’s how I did it.

What you’ll need

  • A plain T-shirt
  • Pastel coloured cotton off-cuts
  • Fabric glue
  • Black thread

What to do

  1. Cut a few circles from the pastel cotton. They don’t need to be perfect, just loose circles approximately 2-3 inches in diameter.
  2. Pin these to your T-shirt, well spaced…

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ART NOUVEAU

This is a great documentary about history of Art Nouveau. Before watching this movie, I was very much familiar with the art of Mucha and Klimt, which were ones of the most famous representatives of this prominent artistic movement. But for me, the Art Nouveau has been always more of a decorative expression style. If you look around yourself with an “Art Nouveau eye”, you may be able to notice ornaments and shapes inspired by it, thus I believe it is still alive!

David Luke Kurtz "Art Of"

The inspiration of a life style is the focus of what we are talking about in this blog. The more you look the more you see people living in a art style custom. This what ART NOUVEAU is.
Found in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Nouveau
Art Nouveau is considered a “total” art style, embracing architecture, graphic art, interior design, and most of the decorative arts including jewellery, furniture, textiles, household silver and other utensils and lighting, as well as the fine arts. According to the philosophy of the style, art should be a way of life. For many well-off Europeans, it was possible to live in an art nouveau-inspired house with art nouveau furniture, silverware, fabrics, ceramics including tableware, jewellery, cigarette cases, etc. Artists desired to combine the fine arts and applied arts, even for utilitarian objects.[3]



We feel this is just a cool beginning to things yet to be discovered on this topic…

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